Tipping point

Things on my project list with no firm deadline have always been a challenge for me. These aren’t things that shouldn’t be on the list because they’re not relevant to my current goals. And they aren’t things that will never get done.  They are commitments I’ve made, to myself or others, that just need to get done sometime.

This happens when the client says “whenever you can get to it” and I look at the current list with firm deadlines and say “OK, sure” because I know I can get to it eventually. In some cases the “client” is me. I may assign a far future due date as I put it into my queue, but I’ll let myself slide that date if something more time-critical comes along.

And that’s when the trouble starts. Soon that thing has been hanging out on the list for an embarrassing number of months. It’s easily brushed aside. It doesn’t take offense. It knows I’ll dredge it off the back of the shelf sooner or later.

It doesn’t take much though for an “I’ll get to you soon” to morph into an “Oh my gosh are you still here!?!?!?!” I’ve reached my tipping point. At that moment “do sometime” turns into priority one. It happens with unstarted projects and it happens with things that are in progress.

My knitting is more portable than weaving or using the sock machine. I can pick it up when I have just a few spare minutes, or spend hours on it. Lengthy projects have tipping points too. It isn’t that I’m not enjoying the process, but I’ll get close enough to the end that 15 minute stints are just frustrating. I want to be done. I want the thing off my list, off my couch and out the door.

The current knitting project has enjoyed both of these scenarios. It took me forever to bubble it up to the top of the list and now that it is going I can’t finish it fast enough.

I’m trying to be better about this. I’ve considered that I might need to say no more often. Or maybe “yes, but not for n months”. Or perhaps I just need to set those deadlines and stick to them.


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Author: Jennifer Kortfelt

Owner, Heron Pond Designs, a fiber and textile exploration.

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