On Finishing

I had in mind this morning to write something about finishing. It’s been a while (a long time) since I’ve been here, the blog. As I started to write I happened to notice that I have two posts sitting in the Drafts section. They’ve been there for a while. One for multiple years. This is neither of them, by the way. I am writing about finishing, but neither of those drafts seem to want to be finished.

My intention, why I am here now, was to talk about finishing projects, knitting projects specifically. There are two broad categories: those for others (client commissions) and those for me. The former are always finished in a timely manner. Project out, money in, no question.

Personal projects, on the other hand, are put aside whenever there are too few hours of the day, too many questions about how to proceed, and sometimes even lack of interest. With the busyness of fall/holidays/craft fair season behind me I was able to take stock, assess, and move from languishing work-in-progress to finished object.

On a suggestion from a friend, the post-it note queen, I hauled out the project queue and did an assessment. What was in progress? What is in the queue ready to start? What yarn needs a pattern chosen? Here’s my result:

On the left: accessories On the right: sweaters The big post-its are unstarted/in queue the small are works-in-progress

I have never been a knitter with just one project going at a time. I nearly always have a set of projects going that include: something complicated to be worked in the quiet with no distractions, something mindless for social knitting times, and something in the middle. As well there is usually something that is stuck for one reason or another. This year there were two sweaters stuck at the point of sleeves.

Grace Note designed by Cap Sease for Green Mountain Spinnery

This sweater, as published, has short sleeves. I loved the lace panels when I saw it on display and knew I’d make it for myself. I also knew I’d never wear a short-sleeved wool sweater. Long after I finished the body, the sweater traveled about in my studio. In and out of “I (am/will) work on this now” project baskets, and back and forth between “out of my way, I need room” and “I’ll feel guilty about all the in-progress projects if I can see them pile” areas.

I finally got the first sleeve knit, at least, to just above where I thought the cuff should land on my arm (it’s picked up from the armhole and knit down.) Then it sat for another few weeks waiting for me to put the stitches on a holder, wash & block the sweater, and try it on to make sure of the sleeve length. After that a quick cuff and before I completely lost momentum: the second sleeve.

Donner designed by Elizabeth Doherty, Blue Bee Studio

This one was stuck at sleeves for a different reason entirely. I loved the sweater design, but was determined to use some stash yarn instead of buying new. The pattern calls for a 100% linen yarn which will flow and drape. The yarn I was determined to use was a 50/50 blend of merino wool and tencel. I was convinced that the tencel would allow me to replicate the drape. The other challenge with my yarn substitution was that I had just the amount of yarn called for for my size. The yarn is hand-dyed by a local dyer but I knew that if I ran out there would be no way to exactly replicate the color I had on hand. So, yarn chicken — here goes! The body was finished and sat for months just like the pink sweater. In fact they spent some quality time together in a project basket, vying for my attention as I contemplated their respective sleeve conundrums. I blocked the body of Donner and tried it on and realized that although it fit, it was never going to be the lovely, drapey garment of the original design. There isn’t enough tencel to counteract the memory and springiness of the merino wool. I did decide to finish it though. I weighed the much-reduced ball of remaining yarn and set off to knit sleeve #1. Fortunately this drop-shoulder design also has 3/4 length sleeves. After finishing the first I had just a few grams over half the yarn left. Whew! Second sleeve here we come.

What you don’t see in that post-it project image is that while all of the projects represented by post-its were lurking in my studio I started and finished two other sweaters! I know! Isn’t that crazy?

So, what do we know here? I’m pretty sure I’ll never be a one-at-a-time project kind of girl. But I also know that having too many projects that aren’t progressing makes me antsy. And there is a huge satisfaction that comes from finishing. Not only do I have new sweaters to wear, but I feel slightly less awful about starting something new.

Author: Jennifer Kortfelt

Owner, Heron Pond Designs, a fiber and textile exploration.

3 thoughts on “On Finishing”

  1. I totally agree with you about the 3 projects. I do the same, and the level of difficulty is as you described. I always have a sock on the needles as well. What yarn did you use for Grace Note?

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      1. I love their yarn. Every year when I go to the NYS Sheep and Wool, I pick up a skein of Cotton Comfort. This year I knit an X-Factor cowl. It is perfect. I love it.

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